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Reach success by overcoming your fears

You’re reading this because you want to change your life completely, achieve your dreams and reach success. Life has presented you with another one of its unique opportunities and you’re stuck in the mud. If you want to overcome your fears and reach success there’s one golden thread that runs constant, you have to follow your heart and be brave.

Letting go to overcome fear

Your fear is completely normal but it is not real. Your mind is more powerful than anything that you’ve ever encountered. It’s time you start relying on your own critical thinking and intuition to reach your goals. Starting up and setting yourself up for success requires you to dig deep and step outside of your comfort zone.

People fear the unknown because the material comforts of daily existence define their lives and give them a sense of purpose. If you want to reach success, you need to follow your heart and start envisioning your own purpose for life, through bold actions that disrupt the general status quo. Keep reading to obliterate your fear and for useful steps to reach success in life and in business.

Block negativity out

You need to start treating negativity like a light prism. Refract negative energy and start seeing the positive benefits in what you as a individual have to offer the world. Share your ideas and thoughts with people constantly. Stand up for what you believe in and have the courage of your convictions. Remember that constructive feedback is always useful but never allow anyone to bring your thoughts or ideas down in life.

It’s often all too easy to get caught up in the hype of negative energy. Influences like co-workers, family and friends can have a huge impact on your daily psyche. If you remain in the funnel with the same attitude then nothing changes. Step out of the washing drum, rinse off negativity and embrace yourself to reach success.

Jealousy only makes you nasty

Yes jealousy can be apart of the fear holding you back from reaching your dreams and achieving success in your personal life and business. People fear what others think about them because we are naturally programmed to impress and please. Let go of people that hold you back and bring you down.

People’s jealousy should be used as a tool to empower your thoughts and make you stronger. The only way to reach success is to ignore jealousy and let it be the fertilizer for your flowers that are about to bloom.

Take a giant leap not just a step

Yes, we have all heard the age old saying; baby steps. Changing your life and starting an amazing journey is all about courage. You might be thinking that you will treat your idea as a sideline project until it grows into something bigger. Perhaps you are perfecting the recipe for success. Nothing is achieved by dawdling.

Your initiative must walk hand in hand with your passion. Leap at the opportunity to change your life,  achieve your goals and reach success. Of course there are steps to follow to reach success, just be more radical about your approach and you could find yourself in the driver’s seat of your own destiny sooner than you think.

Time is valuable, don’t waste it

As mentioned earlier; dawdling won’t accomplish much. There is never that optimal moment to reach success in life. You have to grab it. With a little bit of faith and courage you must make a plan to step outside of your comfort zone and embrace a new you.

Time is the most valued asset on this planet. Don’t waste it. You only get to be on this planet once. Make the most of your time and live life on your own terms, for ultimate success in your personal life and business.

For more life changing lessons that can empower you and help you reach success, accomplishing your dreams, keep checking back on our blog page.

The common reasons why most startup businesses fail to grow

why start ups fail

You probably don’t want to be reminded – especially at this stage of your entrepreneurial endeavour, about the possibility of failure or early stagnation. As grim as the subject is; hearing the reasons why most small/startup businesses fail to grow, gives you, the aspiration for the best head start.

According to statistics published in 2017, the Small Business Administration (SBA), discovered that around one-fifth of startups fail within the first year. Interestingly enough, after investigating further, they found that there were a few common denominators/areas within the business’s which were being managed poorly, or neglected by the new business owners. These were likely the cause of the business’ deterioration.

Here are just some of the common ‘mistakes’ they uncovered which are the possible reason why so many startups fail to grow and in some cases, collapse.

1. Building a strong team is not prioritised

Many new business owners and amateur entrepreneurs fail to see the importance of building a strong team, especially during the start-up phase. They often think they can do it all on their own – and perhaps are incentivised by the cost-effectiveness.
Building a strong, competent team is crucial to the success of a business and, in fact, is most important during a business’s infancy years. This is because new ventures face many challenges; for example, limited capital and resources, as well as the challenge of breaking into the market. Without a strong team who have the skills and experience in building businesses from the ground up, the venture may be at risk of early stagnation.

2. Poor management and leadership

Poor management and leadership are one of the main reasons why startup businesses fail to grow. Most new business owners take on the role of a manager as they perform the management function in the beginning, however, they often struggle with the leadership aspect. With that being said, it is possible to get by on a good management approach even if the leadership aspect is not refined; however, if both areas are weak it is a major cause for concern. Some entrepreneurs are great visionaries and have exceptional business smarts, but are not strong managers or leaders. For the sake of the business, it’s important that they refine their skills in these areas. Luckily one can be taught how to be a great manager and an inspirational leader!

3. Budget allocations are managed insensibly

Startups often have limited capital and monetary resources which is why it’s imperative that money is handled sensibly. Certain important functions which will propel the business forward should be prioritised in the budget. These include areas such as marketing and staff for example – but this depends on the nature of the business. Many unsuccessful startups have allocated capital to the wrong areas and spent money on less important business functions. It’s critical that you identify your businesses fundamental needs and allocate money to these first.

4. Lack of business knowledge

This is an all too common ‘mistake’ in the startup sphere. While anyone can be an entrepreneur – it takes some business smarts to be a successful one. It’s, of course, impossible to know everything well – but that’s why hiring people who have strengths in certain areas where you may have weaknesses is incredibly important. However, if this is not possible, it’s imperative that you learn fundamental business skills so that you are able to carry the business forward. For example; marketing is one of the most important functions, but if you’re not aware of this, and are unable to execute successful marketing techniques due to your limited marketing knowledge, the business will surely suffer. Invest in yourself – in your skills and your business knowledge, so that you are able to give your business the best shot at success.

5. Poor customer relations

Your customer is your bread and butter. If you or your team fail to identify the importance of treating your customer well; communicating with them effectively, and listening to their needs and wants, you will have a hard time building customer loyalty and your sales will likely decline drastically. As a startup breaking into the market, you need to find ways to get the customer on your side. You need to give them a reason to leave what they know, and instead use your services or buy your product. Too many startups are caught up in the operations and keeping the business afloat, that they often forget the reason for what they are doing. The reason is: solving a problem – for who? The customer.

Managing operations in small businesses: 5 essential techniques to learn today

managing operations

Big businesses don’t struggle in the same way when it comes to certain operations, as sometimes small businesses do. This is because you’ll often find big businesses have various departments with many skilled individuals who have extensive experience in managing specific business functions.

The role of operations management within a big business, for example; is a streamlined process headed up by one, or perhaps a few, experienced and highly knowledgeable operations managers. Most times there’s a team of people supporting the managers’ operational objectives by constantly seeking out ways to improve business operations. With a core team, it becomes a lot easier to find solutions and fully optimise operations.

The role of operations management in small businesses on the other hand often lacks a clear-cut process, usually developed through trial and error, and often managed by the business owner themselves, or a manager who is less knowledgeable on how to effectively manage operations. Unfortunately, this is usually because small businesses lack funds, especially during the startup phase.

With the role of operations management being a critical function within a business, what are small businesses to do if they’re unable to hire an experienced operations manager, but want to improve business operations and achieve a streamlined process? Well, the trick is, in fact, going back to basics, and finding a logical step by step method of managing the operational processes.

Take a look at these 5 essential techniques you can learn and implement today, to better manage operations within your small business:

1. Assess each task

The best way to assess a task is by breaking it up by asking vital questions. Firstly, find the source of the work – where does the work come from? Is it from a client, is it from the supervisor, the vendor? This will give you an idea of the nature of the task and how it should be handled.
Secondly, evaluate the process of that specific task. If it’s a work order for example; break down the process of how this task is managed by detailing each step: add up the charges of the work order, enter the values into the computer and hold it for payment from the customer etc. Creating a process is an incredibly important step.

Then, decide on how the work is stored. Is it filed in a personal client folder? Should it be stored away? Through assessing tasks it’s easier to create a process and identify the kind of person suitable for the job; as well as to better create job descriptions and worker manuals.

2. Prioritise tasks

Prioritising tasks is not just about creating a deadline – that comes later on. This covers the sequence of the task; which is also concerned with the creation of the process. Thereafter, tasks can be prioritised according to importance as well as the deadline – which can be managed by the employee themselves. When people have a clear indication of timelines and are aware of priorities they are able to streamline the process for themselves; resulting in a more efficient operation – even without much help from the operations manager.

3. Delegate accordingly

After you, as the manager, have assessed the task and have prioritised the sequence of workflow, you’ll have a good understanding of the perfect type of employee who will be able to carry out the task effectively and efficiently. You’ll know the skills and strengths that the task demands, and you’ll need to align this with those of the employee. Assigning the task to a person within the team who you think will best fit the requirements is called delegating.

4. Evaluate outcomes

Once the task is complete, it’s important that you evaluate the outcomes – especially in the beginning. Be careful not to look like you are micromanaging – it could come across that way if you continue evaluating results every single time after a task is complete, for months on end. Spot evaluations work more effectively as it does not threaten the employee.

5. Find solutions to areas of concern

After evaluating the outcomes, you will have a good idea of where the weak areas in the processes are. It could be a weakness in the work sequence, or even in the employees’ ability to carry out the job. Whatever the concerns are, you will need to find alternative solutions for them; which will hopefully better the operations. Remember that you should be committed to constant improvement – even a solution could prove to be ineffective.

5 books every aspiring entrepreneur should read

Whether you’re about to take a leap of faith or not, I’m sure you can agree that it’s essential for us to feel motivated and inspired. To ensure we live fulfilled, meaningful lives we often need to be reminded that we too can make positive changes; that we too can take a shot at success, and that we are absolutely deserving of a great life. And what better way to feel inspired and motivated than to read books written by people just like us – who found themselves in similar positions, and who made a success of their circumstances?

Take a look at our top 5 must-reads for aspiring entrepreneurs:

1.The $100 Startup by Chris Guillebeau

He also reminds us that success doesn’t favour any one ‘type’ of person, it only favours those that grab hold of opportunities whether big or small;Chris Guillebeau reminds us in this fantastic read that you don’t have to be a trust-fund baby to achieve great success. those that work hard, persevere and are creative in their thinking. In this book, you’ll come across more than a few inspiring examples of ‘accidental entrepreneurs’ who identified and acted upon opportunities which lead to incredible success.Image result for the 100 startup

Favourite Takeaway: “To succeed in a business project, especially one you’re excited about, it helps to think carefully about all the skills you have that could be helpful to others and particularly about the combination of those skills.”

2. The Real Warren Buffett: Managing Capital, Leading People by James O’Loughlin

Image result for The Real Warren Buffett: Managing Capital, Leading PeopleThis book is of course a must-read, especially for aspiring entrepreneurs who want to start off on the right foot. Throughout this book Warren Buffett emphasises the importance of people and capital – he believes it is the core of a business and without these two factors there is no business. Author James O’Loughlin has perfectly described the key techniques Buffet has used throughout the years to balance these two worlds. He dives into Buffets decisions surrounding people and capital and later learns that Buffett recognises that this ‘talent’ has massively contributed to his monumental success.

Favourite Takeaway: “Focus on your customers and lead your people as though their lives depended on your success.”

3. Delivering Happiness by Tony Hsieh

Related imageThis book is primarily about the incredible rise of American online retail giant, Zappos and what it took for them to make over $1 billion in sales in less than ten years. Written by the CEO himself, Tony Hsieh, this book is written with immense honesty as Hsieh highlights even the ‘not-so-pretty’ parts of business and the hard lessons he learnt on the way to the top. Hsieh writes about the mistakes he made in business; the path to finding a balance between profits, passion and purpose and gives the reader incredible insight into how an enduring business brand is built, and how a strong company culture is established.


Favourite Takeaway
: “The best leaders are those that lead by example and are both team followers as well as team leaders. We believe that in general, the best ideas and decisions are made from the bottom up, meaning by those on the front lines that are closest to the issues and/or the customers. The role of a manager is to remove obstacles and enable his/her direct reports to succeed. This means the best leaders are servant-leaders. They serve those they lead.”

4. Losing my Virginity by Richard Branson

Image result for losing my virginity by richard bransonThis book is raw and real; and while it will teach you a thing or two about Richard Branson’s incredible business mind, it will also teach you the importance of just having fun and enjoying life. In this fascinating autobiography, Branson describes how he entered into the world of entrepreneurship; the decisions and choices he made – and is still making on his journey; and even details his ‘formula’ for success, which may just surprise you because it’s not all work – it’s, in fact, a lot of play too.

Favourite Takeaway: “I can honestly say that I have never gone into any business purely to make money. If that is the sole motive then I believe you are better off not doing it. A business has to be involving, it has to be fun, and it has to exercise your creative instincts.”

5. The Hard Things about the Hard Things by Ben Horowitz

Image result for The Hard Things about the Hard Things by Ben HorowitzBen Horowitz is one of Silicon Valley’s most respected entrepreneurs, and the co-founder of venture capital firm, Andreessen Horowitz. In his book, ‘The Hard Things about the Hard Things’ he reflects on his experiences with founding, running, selling, buying, managing, and investing in technology companies – and he is brutally honest about what it takes to be successful. This book is packed with the wisdom which will help you identify and navigate the problems that every entrepreneur encounters especially during their business’s infancy years. A lot of people boast about how great it is to start a business, but Ben Horowitz is honest about how hard it is to run one.

Favourite Takeaway: “Great CEOs face the pain. They deal with the sleepless nights, the cold sweats, and what my friend the great Alfred Chuang (legendary co-founder and CEO of BEA Systems) calls “the torture.” Whenever I meet a successful CEO, I ask them how they did it. Mediocre CEOs point to their brilliant strategic moves or their intuitive business sense or a variety of other self-congratulatory explanations. The great CEOs tend to be remarkably consistent in their answers. They all say, “I didn’t quit.”